Using the Shed printer, copier & scanner

We have installed an Epson multi-function printer. It connects by WiFi, so the only connecting cable is the mains one. It can be unplugged and re-sited anywhere in the shed.

The printer is sensitive to dust, so should be covered with a dust sheet if there is a likelihood of dust in the area around the printer.

This note describes some basics about how to use the printer to print, copy or scan documents. Click any of the headings below to find out more. Some sections contain images - you can usually click them to see a larger version. Note that we have not connected the printer as a fax machine.

If you need more help than we provide here, there is a user guide for the printer here. If you still need help, please get in touch with Andy Henderson and he'll try to arrange something for you.

You'll find very little here that's new to you. Most printers work in a similar way even if they come from different manufacturers.

It would be worth skimming through the following sections, though, in case there are some features you are unaware of.

The control panel is at the front of the printer. Pull it gently from the bottom to hinge it out making it easier to see.

Press the power button at the top left of the control panel. The display screen will light up. If nothing happens, check the printer is plugged in and switched on at the wall socket.

Note that it can take a while for the printer to warm up.

Press the power button at the top left of the control panel to start the shut down process. The display screen asks you to confirm by pressing the OK button. Please do not switch off at the wall socket or disconnect until the power light goes out. The printer needs time to cap the ink cartridges so they don't dry out.

Please:

  • If you have been copying or scanning, remove your original from under the document cover.
  • Remove paper from the feeder and replace it in the packet. Leaving paper in the printer causes it to curl and can cause a paper jam.
  • Fold the control panel away by pressing gently at the bottom of the panel.
  • Fold the front and rear paper trays away to minimise the risk of dust entering and clogging the printer.

While there is still work needing to be done in the shed, we have provided a dust cover, please use it to cover the printer and paper when not in use.

Start by opening the feeder guard and pulling up the paper support...

Slide the paper guides open...

Insert paper centrally - it should fall easily into the printer mechanism...

Close the paper guides so they are snug against the sides of the paper - but not gripping or bending it. Then fold the feeder guard back into place...

Finally, slide out the front paper tray...

We have named the printer "Mens Shed printer" and made it the default device.

You should be able to use any program's print feature without any further interaction once the printer has been switched on.

The printer is capable of double-sided printing. Please consider using this feature to save paper if printing more than one page. You should see an option to print single or double-sided in your program's print window (you might need to click a 'Printer properties' or 'Advanced' button).

You won't normally see the printer's network name but, in case you do, it identifies as: 'EPSON WF-2810 Series'.

Make sure the printer is switched on.

Lift the document cover to reveal the glass...

If necessary, clean the glass with a clean, dry cloth.

Place your document face down on the scanner glass, pushing it to the left hand corner nearest the control panel. The top of your document should point to the right.

Close the cover gently.

Press the left or right arrow buttons on the control panel until the display screen shows 'Copy' and press 'OK'. Follow the prompts to set:

  • Number of copies
  • Colour or monochrome copies
  • Press OK to see additional settings
  • Press OK again then the copy button:
    to start your copy.

Make sure the printer is switched on.

Lift the document cover to reveal the glass...

If necessary, clean the glass with a clean, dry cloth.

Place your document face down on the scanner glass, pushing it to the left hand corner nearest the control panel. The top of your document should point to the right.

Close the cover gently.

At one of the laptops...

  • Type "scan" in the toolbar search box, to see 'Windows fax and scan', select it (there are a bunch of different ways to open the scan app, if you prefer a different method, go for it).
  • Click 'New scan' at the top left of the window.
  • Use the dropdown at the left of the new scan window to select from 'Color', 'Grayscale', or 'Black and white'.
  • Click 'Preview' to see a small version of your scanned image; if it needs repositioning, do that and click 'Preview' again; when you are happy...
  • Click 'Scan'.

Your scanned document is stored automatically in folder 'Scanned documents' in the 'Documents' folder.

You might be asked to confirm paper settings when changing paper. When using normal printer paper, select Plain A4 and press OK.

Printer ink is indecently expensive so please use the printer only when you need to. In practice it is easier to read most documents via the laptops because that allows you to increase print size if necessary.

For the time being we are not asking for contributions when printing documents assuming we won't need to replace the cartridges frequently. That might need to change if the printer gets used a lot.

You might see a warning that ink in a particular cartridge is low. That's not a cue to replace the cartridge - it still has ink in it. Instead, please check to see if we have a replacement cartridge of the relevant colour. If not, let Andy Henderson know so he can source a replacement.

If a cartridge is empty, there are instructions for replacing it in the user manual starting at page 140. Alternatively, let Andy Henderson know so he can do the replacement.

You might see dire warnings because we are not using genuine Epson cartridges. You can safely ignore/override them.

Communications roles & responsibilities

We see three main types of communication that we need to manage:

  • Communications to the public
  • Communications to members
  • Communications from the public

Click any of these headings for more information...

Nik Nickerson is responsible for all communications to the public including: the press; URC magazine; and the Facebook page. The news and events section of the web site automatically update to match the Facebook page.

Nik will give the committee members opportunity to review publicity articles before they go out.

If you have an item of news for publication, please send it to Nik.

Nik Nickerson will prepare a monthly HIMS sheet to keep members informed about what’s happening. He will send it to members by email and post. He will also arrange for printed copies to be available in the shed.

Tony George will send out other all-member emails as necessary. He will attempt to minimise the number of emails by combining messages where possible. He will post copies of all-member emails on the message board in the shed.

Tony can also post messages to Facebook (and therefore our web site) when appropriate.

Roger Davies will organise member meetings; their frequency and nature will probably change over time as we learn more about what works well.

If you have an item of news for members, please send it to Nik (stating it is for members only if that’s not clear).

Messages will come to us in a number of ways:

  • Via the shed telephone – Roger Davies will arrange for a message book next to the phone and will review it from time to time to ensure messages are getting through to the right people.
  • Via Facebook and ‘Contact us’ on the web site – Andy Henderson will: decide whether messages need responses; reply to straightforward ones; and pass others on.
  • Via post – Don Bates will discard junk mail and make sure post for us and the URC goes to the right post box. Roger Davies will review our post and ensure it gets to the appropriate person.
  • Via members – If you are unsure who should deal with a message, please pass it to Roger Davies (either directly or via the message book).

In any case, all requests for help should go to Roger Davies who will determine the best way to deal with them. We will use the web site, HIMS sheet and all-member emails to notify members of different projects and how they can get involved.

Tim Norgate will take on Roger’s responsibilities in his absence.

Use one of these links to send an email. Alternatively, log in to see phone numbers and email addresses.

Getting to the internet from the shed

The phone and broadband connection is provided by KSM Telecom who also pick up the cost of our calls and internet use. Please remember them if you hear of a firm or organisation wanting to get connected!

It's difficult to provide step-by-step instructions for connecting your device to the internet because there are so many variations even within a single operating system. If, however, you are used to connecting to public networks, ours is no different.

Click any of these headings to find out more...

As with any public WiFi network, you should be aware that anyone can listen in to your online conversation. That being said, the metal frame of our shed acts as a Faraday cage so our network has a very limited range outside the shed. Also most sites - including ours - force an encrypted connection (indicated by https) which is managed independently from our network.

We provide two WiFi networks:

  • HIMS Visitor - is not password connected or encrypted.
  • Mens Shed Assoc HI - is password protected and encrypted.

See below for more information.

We provide a low speed connection for casual use by visitors. It is not password protected, so is the simplest way to connect. The connection's id (SSID) is "HIMS Visitor".

If a visitor wants access to the internet, direct them to this connection. Similarly any members who need casual, occasional internet access to non-sensitive sites (such as online banking or shopping).

We provide a full-speed, password-protected, encrypted connection called "Mens Shed Assoc HI". The password is on display on the shed noticeboard.

You need to be in the members' area to see the password. Log in to see it now.

The shed's metal frame makes access from outside difficult.

If you want to use the internet from the area out the front, you can improve access by leaving the doors open.

You can connect directly to the router using a network cable if your device has an ethernet port. The ethernet ports are at the rear of the router. This method of connection might be useful if there is a problem with the WiFi network.

You should not, however, use this method for regular access because it risks disrupting the network if cables become dislodged.

You shouldn't need to do anything special. The laptops connect to the internet, with full-speed access, automatically.

Click here to see Google's explanation of how to connect an Android phone or tablet to WiFi.

Click here to see Microsoft's explanation of how to connect a Windows 10 device to WiFi.

Click here to see Apple's explanation of how to connect an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch to Wifi.

Click here to see Apple's explanation of how to connect an Apple Mac to WiFi.

If you have a problem connecting - and you are using the password-protected connection - first check the password (shown here or on the Shed noticeboard). We might have had to change it for security purposes.

Next, take a look at the router - it's the box labelled Zyxel connected to the BT access box. It shows the following lights:

If the first light - the power light - is dark, the router is not plugged in to the mains; you'll need to plug it in. If it is flashing, the router is starting up, wait until it goes solid green and try again to connect.

If the third light - the internet light - is dark or red, there is no connection to the internet from the router (note it will show red for a short time while the router is starting up). Check the cable connecting the router to the BT access box is firmly connected at both ends. If it is, we have a problem with the KSM service you can contact KSM at 023 9229 0500 (but note that, without an internet connection the phone in the shed won't work).

If the light is green (either solid or flashing), the router is connected to the internet; the problem is most likely with the laptop.

You shouldn't need to do anything with the router but, for completeness, the user guide is here

.

Using the Shed telephone

The phone and broadband connection is provided by KSM Telecom who also pick up the cost of our calls and internet use. Please remember them if you hear of a firm or organisation wanting to get connected!

If you are familiar with using a wireless phone, or a mobile phone, the chances are you'll be able to use the shed phone - although the setup is different to a domestic DECT phone, see 'If you can't connect' below.

Click any of these headings to find out more...

The shed phone number is 023 9400 5160.

We expect people will use it mostly to:

  • Find out if the shed is open at any particular time
  • Get in touch with people known to be at the shed at any time

Although there is a message book, if you want to send a message it would be better to complete the simple form here since that will allow us to route your message to the appropriate person quickly and accurately.

If you are passing on the phone number, please note the spacing: you can omit 023 if dialling from an 023 number, showing the number as 02394 is incorrect.

The handset switches on automatically when you remove it from the charger cradle (assuming the cradle is plugged in).

If the screen does not light up, turn the handset on by pressing the red on-hook button (which also shows a power icon).

Please bear in mind that KSM is picking up our phone bill so please do not abuse that relationship.

Use the keypad to enter the number you are calling and press the green off-hook key or 'OK' to start your call.

If you are having difficulty hearing the person at the other end, of if their voice is too loud, use the left and right arrow sections of the circular cursor control in the centre of the handset to adjust the volume.

Press the red on-hook key to complete your call.

Please return to the handset to the charger cradle unless you are going to make another call. If the phone battery goes flat, other members won't be able to use it.

When we receive a call, the handset rings and the red power light flashes rapidly (a slow flash indicates a voice mail - see below). To answer the call press the green off-hook key.

If you ignore the call, the caller is transferred to voice mail (see below).

We will be setting up a message book. We're not publicising the phone number so we're not expecting many calls. If you can help the caller, that's good. Otherwise, politely suggest they call again or use 'Contact us' on the web site.

If someone rings us and we don't answer, they are transferred automatically to voice mail. That works even if the power in the shed is completely shut down.

The handset registers there's a voicemail waiting by slowly flashing the red power light. It also shows a call waiting icon on the screen.

To hear the voice mail, press and hold the '1' key (which also shows a voice mail icon) until you hear a voice prompt that will take you through listening to the message, saving it or deleting it.

If you put the handset down somewhere and can't remember where you left it, press the wireless button on the Yealink base station (the device connected to the router, not the charging cradle). The handset will ring.

To cancel ringing, press any key on the handset or press the wireless button again.

KSM maintains a log of all calls made and received together with date, time and duration. We have access to that log via an online service provided by KSM.

If the battery is flat, you've no choice but to place the handset into the charging cradle (the red power light will illuminate to show it is on charge) and wait for a while.

The metal skin of the shed means it acts as a Faraday cage. You will lose connection to the base station if you take the handset outside unless you use it very close to the shed or can connect through an open door. The icon at the top left of the handset screen indicates the strength of signal to the Yealink hub.

Otherwise, you should check the connection through to the internet. Note that unlike domestic DECT phones, the handset needs an internet connection to work.

The hub is the black box connected to the router which is, in turn, connected to the BT access box. Note the charger cradle is not involved in making calls - all it does is charge the handset.

There are three lights at the bottom right. If the bottom one is not on, the hub is not connected to the mains; you'll need to plug it in. If the middle is not solid green, the hub can't connect to the internet, check:

  • The router is working OK (see next section)
  • The network cable between the hub and the router is securely connected at both ends.

That's the box labelled Zyxel connected between the hub and the BT access box. It shows the following lights:

If the first light - the power light - is dark, the router is not plugged in to the mains; you'll need to plug it in. If it is flashing, the router is starting up, wait until it goes solid green and try again to connect.

If the third light - the internet light - is dark or red, there is no connection to the internet from the router (note it will show red for a short time while the router is starting up). Check the cable connecting the router to the BT access box is firmly connected at both ends. If it is, we have a problem with the KSM service you can contact KSM at 023 9229 0500 (but note that, without an internet connection the phone in the shed won't work).

You shouldn't need to do anything with the router but, for completeness, the user guide is here.

If you need more information than we provide here, click here to see the user manual.

About this site

This article describes how to get around the site and what it can do for you.

In the following sections, click any  to see more and click any image to see a larger version.

The basics

You will always see a list of menu items towards the top of the page in a strip with a cream background.

The menus show you additional features when you log in to the members' area - see below.

Hover your mouse over any menu option to see any subsidiary menu options. Click the option you want, to select it. In the above image, I hovered my mouse over 'About us' to see the options below it and then hovered over 'Get in touch'; I just need to click to see that page.

Depending on your device (and sometimes which way you hold it) you will either see:

  • a list of menu items towards the top of the page in a strip with a cream background; or
  • a menu icon like this:

The menus show you additional features when you log in to the members' area - see below.

Tap any menu option to see any subsidiary menu options. If there are no subsidiary options (for example the 'News' item), you will be taken to that page. Tap any sub-option you want, to select it. In the image on the right, I tapped 'About us' to see the options below it and then tapped 'Get in touch' ; the grey background indicates the page is about to be displayed.

Tap the icon to see a list of all the menu options and sub-options. Tap any of the options to select it.

Tap the menu icon again to hide the list.

Clickable links appear in red and bold text like this. If you use a mouse, hovering over a link will underline it

Some images on the site show a larger version if you click them. The larger version is shown on top of the page. To return to the page click/tap the 'X' at the top right of the image or click/tap anywhere outside the image.

If you use a mouse, hovering over any image with a larger version will cause it to grow slightly to indicate a larger version is available.

You can try it now using the logo image above.

We show some text in collapsible sections to make it easier for you to go to the section that interests you. We use that technique in this page.

A twistie like this indicates a collapsed section. If you click/tap it (or the link next to it) the section expands so you can read it. You already did that to see this explanation. The twistie twists to point down like this , click it again to collapse the section.

A collapsed section will appear like this.

Click the twistie again to collapse this section.

At the foot of every page in the site you will see a footer section with a cream background.

This provides some links to material that most people expect to find in footer sections including legal stuff and links to contact us. You will also see links to enter/leave the members' area (see below).

We have implemented a responsive layout which means the site will always display sensibly regardless of how wide the screen. In particular, people can see all the site's content just as well if they are using a desktop PC or a small mobile phone.

If you are using a desktop, you can see how this works by reducing the width of the window showing this page. You will see the site adjusts automatically to reduced and increased widths.

Note that this also means you can use your browser's 'zoom' function to increase the size of text and images shown by our web pages. You might find that particularly useful if your eyesight is not so good.

The public site

These sections describe the web site as it appears to members of the public...

This is the page most people first see when want to find out more about us. We therefore use it as a summary of who we are, where we are and what we do.

We don't want to maintain news and event details in both the web site and in Facebook. So, for the time being, we use Facebook for these items. In the web site, the news and events pages import summaries from Facebook which link to more detail on the Facebook pages.

You do not need a Facebook account to see those items. If you do have an account, however, you can use Facebook notifications to get alerts of new events and news items.

The 'Join us' page identifies the benefits of Shed membership and our suggested annual donation for new members. It also links to an online form (or a printable version if people prefer) for signing up.

We can include anything we want here. For the time being we have just two categories of article, but we can add more if we want.

This article you are reading is an example.

This area of the site describes:

  • The Shed
  • Our charitable status
  • Our organisation - including our trustees and committee members
  • How to get in touch with us
  • Our history

Members' area

These sections describe what is available in the members' area of the site and how members can get to it.

If you are not already logged in to the members' area of the site you will see a 'Members' area' link:

  • as the last menu item at the top of each page
  • in the footer of every page under 'Site services'

Click either of these links to see the login page as shown on the right.

Members are given a username and password by the web site editor.

If you check the 'Remember me' box, the site will attempt to keep you logged in for up to 14 days. If you log out (see below) you will need to log in again to get to the members' area regardless of whether you check this box, or not.

The menu shown at the top of each page automatically changes when you enter the members' area. Notably, the 'Members' area' option disappears and a 'Member services' option appears instead.

The 'Member services' option provides links to several services as described below.

Using this service you can:

  • Retrieve contacts for any member that allows you to see them
  • Email any member who has provided us with an email address without you needing to know the address

To start with you see this page:

To find someone enter all or part of their first or last name, or both. Case doesn't matter, so each the following will find all members called Andy or Andrew:

  • And
  • and
  • nd

If you entry matches more than one member you will see a list of matches so you can choose one.

The site displays the members' information subject to their permission.

Please treat members' information with respect and do not disclose it to anyone else without their permission unless solely necessary for the operation of Hayling Island Men's Shed. If you are asked for another members' email address, for example, you should email the member saying the requester wants to get in touch.

Use this service to see - and change - the basic information we hold about you:

  • name
  • contact details
  • site password
  • emergency contact details
  • whether we can show your information to other members
  • whether you can gift aid your donations to us

Any information you provide is subject to our privacy policy which explains how we protect it.

We show member-only information in two ways:

  • Private pages indicated by a padlock icon at the left of the page. These pages and articles appear only if you are logged in to the members' area.
  • Sections of pages that we mark as visible only to members.

The site holds details about projects we embark on. For now, the project pages are linked only from the members' area.

There is no requirement to add new projects to the site but if you do, you:

  • Inform other members about what you are doing
  • Have the opportunity to seek help with your project
  • Make it easier for participants to communicate with each other
  • Optionally, help the Shed publicise its activities and reach new members

For the time being, Andy Henderson can add new projects for you. They can be projects that are: under way, not started yet, or past projects. Once created, projects can be updated by any participant provided they are logged in to the members' area.

We hold the following details about each project:

  • Title (mandatory)
  • Description (mandatory)
  • Private description - if you decide to show your project to the public, only this information and the participant lists are withheld
  • Start date if known
  • Whether the project should be visible to the public, or not
  • A list of participants, divided into:
    • Project leaders - contactable by members of the public, project leaders also get automatic notification of changes to their projects
    • Other participants - contactable by all project participants
  • Any help you might need with the project
  • Any results produced by the project
  • Completion date if known

We hold a simple database of assets we own. We do not include low cost items such as screwdrivers or saws, but we include all electrical items that can be plugged into the mains.

We hold the following details about each asset:

  • Asset id (mandatory)
  • Manufacturer
  • Model
  • Short description (mandatory)
  • Status, one of: active, missing or scrapped
  • Whether the asset needs electrical testing or not and, if so, the date of the last test (or blank if not tested)
  • Notes about the asset

We provide various ways to get to assets:

  • A list of all assets
  • A list of scrapped items
  • A list of items needing testing sorted by test date (so those that need testing - or are about to need testing - are shown first)
  • Display a single asset given its id
  • Search the asset database

The 'Administration' sub-menu item links to services available only to specific members.

While you are logged in to the members' area, you will find a log out link in the footer of every page under 'Site services'. Click this link to to see a confirmation page prior to logging out.

If you don't log out explicitly, then:

  • If you checked the 'Remember me' box at log in, the site will attempt to keep you logged in for up to 14 days on the same device using the same browser.
  • Otherwise, you are logged out automatically if you close your browser or shut down your device.

No-one can tell what your password is. Not even site administrators.

There is a 'Lost your password?' link on the log in page. Click the link and follow the instructions to ask the site to email you a link that allows you to enter a new one.

If you forget your username, contact Andy Henderson who can tell you what it is.

Logo suggestion

This is the logo I've created for the web site. It's derivative of the logo on the last site but replaces the picture of a wooden shed with a schematic representation of the new shed.

I've used a simple image because I'm not a graphic artist, and it's more effective as a logo (you choose which counts most).

The white space in the middle is intended to represent an open (welcoming) door. I've shown the shed at an angle to indicate informality.

That approach is fine for situations where the shed's name is shown next to it. For example: the heading to this page; or a similar heading to a flyer.

The problem comes when we want to show a name along with the logo. "Hayling Island Men's Shed Association" is a lot to cram in. I've already dropped the "Association" from the web site title (I think it makes us sound too formal - the previous site did the same). Here are some ways we can incorporate the shortened name into the logo...

As you can see, the briefer the text, the more readable.

The first example might be appropriate when we want the logo to be meaningful, stand-alone. The last could be good where the logo needs to hint at what it means, but can't be large - perhaps on sweat shirts.

This is my attempt to reproduce the existing shirt logo but - to my taste - it's a little bulky...

The logo images all have a transparent background so they can be used on top of a coloured area, for example:

 

I produced this version for use on a flag. It is larger than the others and is designed to work well with any background - the pink is added to show where the image is transparent: